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Thread: Safeway's Sweet AirMiles Deals

  1. #8761
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    I just signed up for the PC Plus points program (Loblaws, Extra Foods, Superstore) and can't help but notice the difference between it and Airmiles. PC Plus points are credited to my account immediately when I check out:

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    ...while Airmiles take weeks or even months to show up in my account -- if ever (I just had to followup on some missing airmiles but was told I had to wait 120 days -- 4 months! -- before they would even look at it):

    Name:  ams.png
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    operabob, kelsie94 and 4sure5 like this.

  2. #8762
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    While I'm doing screen shots of the airmiles.ca website, here's an interesting blurb at the top of their Contact Us page:

    Name:  am2.png
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    When I read about a "special employee meeting" to be held on a Thursday near the end of the month in the 4th quarter -- sounds like mass layoffs to me.

    Either that or they're giving everyone huge Christmas bonuses with all the extra revenue they gouged from their loyal members.

    But I'm betting on the former....

  3. #8763
    Canadian Genius operabob's Avatar
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    It would seem odd that there might be layoffs as all the reading I've done indicates they are a highly profitable business so I vote for the later.

    Either that or the minions are revolting against management's insistence on what most might see as unethical practices.

    You go to your bank to withdraw $100 from your account, they tell you you can withdraw $100 but we'll only give you $75.40 then when they give it to you it only comes to $64.90.

    You complain and are told as a long time loyal bank customer you've been given the privilege of paying a $10.50/withdrawal because "people have been asking for it".

    Frontline workers with only a modicum of conscious must have great difficulty spinning this yarn to people.

    I will be writing my consumer affairs branch and also CBC's Marketplace. This is just the sort of story they love to deal with. I'll get people the contact information so you can join in.

    PS: I'm signing up for PC Plus too.
    Last edited by operabob; Sun, Nov 24th, 2013 at 10:41 AM.
    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


  4. #8764
    Canadian Genius operabob's Avatar
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    PS: I was part of an Internet focus group yesterday.

    PC is considering bringing in a pre-paid credit card

    No fees if you make at least 15 purchases or $1,000 total purchases per month. The purchases can be anywhere and you get 2 PC points per $1 spent.

    While Airmiles is reducing benefits PC is doing the exact opposite to attract customers.

    Add in that the local RCSS gives 5 cents/liter of gas even though it's a 20 minute drive I'm in!
    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


  5. #8765
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    Last edited by operabob; Sun, Nov 24th, 2013 at 12:44 PM.
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    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


  6. #8766
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    VEGAS PILGRIM and nessa23 like this.
    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


  7. #8767
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    Well don't cry any tears for the company--my store was full of big shoppers (myself included)...spent 135 (including 25$ Mc D gift card), and a pile of frozen food (Pizza Pops, Europe's Best Frozen Fruit, and one of those hams) counting the 20 AM for the gift card, walked out with 465 AM's (plus another 50 to come for using the Amex card)...

    Couple of minor observations:

    That front page coupon for McCains pizza has some great alternatives--instead of pizza, got 4 packs of 8 pizza pockets (2.99 apparently were 7.49$ regular price)...needed to get to 100$ spend, so that helped--my freezer is full and happy



    And the Pizza Pops had coupons for a free Yop, whatever that is.


    Also, why the heck can't they keep stuff in stock--last week they didn't have the Butchers Cut hams, this week, they were out of the lasagna...why put out coupons or advertise items for sale when they are going to run out...that is definitely a pet peeve.

    Anyhow, freezer is nice and full, so I'll have to spend the next little while making room...it never ends
    I use DropBox to store my Las Vegas pictures, books, etc., online. It works on every device/computer that I use, and gives you 2.0GB of storage for FREE. Use the link below, sign up, and you and I will both get an EXTRA 500MB of storage, for FREE.
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  8. #8768
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    Quote Originally Posted by operabob View Post
    It would seem odd that there might be layoffs as all the reading I've done indicates they are a highly profitable business so I vote for the later.

    Either that or the minions are revolting against management's insistence on what most might see as unethical practices.

    You go to your bank to withdraw $100 from your account, they tell you you can withdraw $100 but we'll only give you $75.40 then when they give it to you it only comes to $64.90.

    You complain and are told as a long time loyal bank customer you've been given the privilege of paying a $10.50/withdrawal because "people have been asking for it".

    Frontline workers with only a modicum of conscious must have great difficulty spinning this yarn to people.

    I will be writing my consumer affairs branch and also CBC's Marketplace. This is just the sort of story they love to deal with. I'll get people the contact information so you can join in.

    PS: I'm signing up for PC Plus too.
    What is worse than the $10.50 booking fee is the fact some hotels you can book have taxes and fees avg $30 a night, mostly the best western ones.
    operabob and cheekysaver like this.

  9. #8769
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    And the Pizza Pops had coupons for a free Yop, whatever that is.
    Drinkable yogurt!
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    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


  10. #8770
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    Quote Originally Posted by operabob View Post
    Drinkable yogurt!

    No kidding, that is what it is--seem to be on the pepperoni and bacon flavour by the way. Anyhow that changes the OB™ math--$2.50 less 1$ AM less 1$ retail on the Yop = 50
    cents a package--if the actual retail is higher than that, you could be paid to shop™

    Might be the only way for me to "take my yogurt".

    Part of the Yoplait General Mills conglomerate, I see, as is Pillsbury--big surprise.
    cheekysaver likes this.
    I use DropBox to store my Las Vegas pictures, books, etc., online. It works on every device/computer that I use, and gives you 2.0GB of storage for FREE. Use the link below, sign up, and you and I will both get an EXTRA 500MB of storage, for FREE.
    https://db.tt/UXGIw4Ke

  11. #8771
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    No kidding, that is what it is--seem to be on the pepperoni and bacon flavour by the way. Anyhow that changes the OB™ math--$2.50 less 1$ AM less 1$ retail on the Yop = 50
    cents a package--if the actual retail is higher than that, you could be paid to shop™

    Might be the only way for me to "take my yogurt".

    Part of the Yoplait General Mills conglomerate, I see, as is Pillsbury--big surprise.
    Comes up as an AM offer fairly regularly too.
    VEGAS PILGRIM and cheekysaver like this.
    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


  12. #8772
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    Well I hope the corporate spies are seeing how many are jumping ship, between PC points and SDM points it is hard to shop at Safeway. Oh and yes, I can PM to almost any other store... Safeway please put on some good air miles deals to make it worth my while to stay with you...

  13. #8773
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    Wondering if Black Friday will be even better:

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    Was $35 - Now $25!
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    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


  14. #8774
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    Just posted this on the CBC's Marketplace forums.

    You go to the bank and withdraw $100. The teller gives you $64.90. "What's this," you ask.

    "Oh, we've revalued your money and $100 is now $75.40", says the teller.

    "But you only gave me $64.90!"

    "As a long term client we're privileged to offer you a $10.50 Loyalty Fee charge because customers like you ask for it."

    I'm sure if your bank did this to you you'd head straight to the police and this is exactly what Airmiles Canada has just done to their members.

    To evaluate the actual cash value of an Airmile it was a simple matter to add up the number of Airmiles needed to purchase all gift cards and certificates and get an average value of $0.139/AM. Recently, Airmiles unilaterally revalued all to create a new value of $0.105 a 24.6% reduction in value ($100 is now $75.40)

    In the past you could exchange Miles for hotel gift cards. Advantages were that you could pick your own room level, pay all associated costs and be a member of the hotel's loyalty program.

    Recently, Airmiles suspended the gift cards and members wishing to book hotels with points must do so through the website, have no choice of room, pay extras out of pocket AND MUST PAY A $10.50 "LOYALTY FEE" for the privilege of doing so!

    In a masterful piece of dislogic even George Orwell would have been proud of the justification given on their own website is that it was done,"In response to feedback from Collectors like you".

    What Collector asks to pay fees!

    Please do an expose on Loyalty Programs such as Airmiles Canada.
    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


  15. #8775
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    The coming price war: U.S. retail giants plan big push to win over more Canadian shoppers with deep discounts

    David Friend, Canadian Press | 25/11/13 | Last Updated: 25/11/13 1:23 PM ET
    More from Canadian Press

    Don Healy / Postmedia NewsFor shoppers, it could mean significant price reductions, “Buy One, Get One Free” offers and similar promotions, while price matching and lax exchange rules set precedents.





    TORONTO — Now that American retailers have landed in Canada, prepare for the fireworks as stores launch massive promotions and deep discounts in an attempt to draw shoppers.
    The arrival of Target and Marshalls — and the expansion of Walmart — hasn’t exactly revolutionized shopping, but it has laid the foundation for what industry watchers say will be a bigger fight for marketshare next year.
    Black Friday deals in U.S. expected to lure even more discount-hungry Canadian shoppers this year

    A poll released Thursday by the Bank of Montreal says 47 per cent of Canadians it surveyed planned on shopping on Black Friday this year — up from 41 per cent last year — with each shopper expecting to spend an average of $292. Keep reading.

    “We can expect to see some very desperate retailers,” said Brynn Winegard, a marketing expert at Winegard and Company.
    “A lot of organizations will be vying for the same amount of consumer dollars.”
    For shoppers, that could mean significant price reductions, “Buy One, Get One Free” offers and similar promotions, while price matching and lax exchange rules set precedents.
    And the spectacle won’t be limited to the big U.S. chains, as even domestic companies like Canadian Tire, Joe Fresh and Indigo will ramp up the spectacle around their own operations.
    Much of this competition was supposed to play out earlier this year when Target first set foot in the country amid a level of hype rarely seen in the industry. But the retailer failed to impress consumers, especially those who had loyally crossed the border to shop at its U.S. Target locations.
    A survey released by Level5, a brand strategy adviser, found that consumer sentiment for Target is on level with the struggling operations of Sears Canada.
    Some customers likened Canada’s version to “Target Lite,” with lackluster prices and an atmosphere that, despite renovations, still had the feel of the Zellers outlets that occupied the same spaces for years before.
    Peter J. Thompson/National PostIndigo Books and other Canadian retailers are likely to follow U.S. chains with their own deals.



    “First impressions are big, and so Target’s not getting off to a great start,” said Bobby Hagedorn, a retail industry analyst at Edward Jones, who said the misstep gave competitors a lead.
    “All the Canadian companies are now running and seem to be more prepared than they were before. We’re in a period of transition.”
    Despite the time spared, the U.S. challengers are plentiful and diverse, with big names like Microsoft setting up shop while more niche retailers, such as Zara Home, and women’s clothing shops Ann Taylor and Black House, White Market, vie to corner their own segments.
    In department stores, Hudson’s Bay Co. struck an agreement to bring Saks Inc. to Canada while next year upscale retailer Nordstrom enters the mix nationwide with locations acquired from Sears Canada.
    Related



    One of the most competitive spaces will be grocery stores where intermittent price wars have waged on for years. The recent rollout of competitively-priced produce sections at Walmart supercentres has added to the pressure, while Target also launched a mini-supermarket inside its stores.
    Add Amazon.com Inc. to the list after the Internet company opened a virtual supermarket in Canada that ships non-perishable food items directly to consumer’s homes.
    In response, Canadian grocery chains have ramped up consolidation to grab a stronger market presence and more buying power with manufacturers, which helps keep their prices lower. Earlier this year, Loblaw agreed to buy Shoppers Drug Mart Corp. while Sobeys picked up the Canadian assets of U.S. grocer Safeway.
    I haven’t even gone to the Target since it moved here . . . Everyone has said it’s still not as good as the states


    It’s debatable how much the heightened activity in Canada has convinced shoppers to stay within the country.
    Data from Statistics Canada shows a climb in the number of trips to the United States throughout the year, encouraged by the introduction of higher duty-free allowances and a steady exchange rate.
    In September, 2.74 million cross-border daytrips were made by car, a 1.2% increase from the busy August summer travel season when 2.67 million trips were made.
    Year by year, the number of same-day trips are rising too. In 2010, Canadians made 26.3 million trips, rising to 31 million the next year, and 32.4 million in 2012.
    While it’s difficult to determine how many of those were shopping trips, the data is still an indication that Canadians aren’t staying home in huge numbers.
    Niagara Falls resident Jessica Manning says the U.S. is a more attractive place to shop for anyone who can muster up the time.
    Walmart CanadaOne of the most competitive spaces will be grocery stores where intermittent price wars have waged on for years. Above, a Walmart store in Laval, Quebec.



    “They enjoy Canadians shopping there, and they’re willing to help you more, I find, than in Canada,” she said. “When I shop here (in Canada) I find there are very few sizes left, while in the states they have better stock.”
    Other longtime cross-border shoppers have scaled back on the number of trips they make, including Toronto-area resident Anne Yau. She said that she isn’t spending more at home, even with the wider selection of U.S. retailers in Canada.
    “To be honest, I haven’t even gone to the Target since it moved here,” she said. “Everyone has said it’s still not as good as the states, and they don’t carry as many products. The deals are not as good.”
    Opinions like that are painful for retailers as they’re a sign that Canadians, who benefited from widespread sales and a strong loonie during the economic downturn, now expect those rock-bottom prices.
    Over several years, that could have a detrimental impact on the retail industry because deep discounts aren’t as effective in stimulating the economy, said Winegard.
    Retailers also face tepid consumer spending growth, which in recent months has inched ahead only slightly. Economists predict that Canadians will remain cautious about their finances and keep spending low into next year.
    In September, home renovations retailer Rona chief executive officer Robert Sawyer emphasized the negative impact of the U.S. entrants, telling an industry conference that “in Ontario, it’s a bloodbath for every retailer.”
    In Ontario, it’s a bloodbath for every retailer . . . It’s difficult, not only for the hardware business
    “It’s difficult, not only for the hardware business,” he said.
    Executives at Target have assured investors that while they may be knocked down, they’re still in the game. Chief executive Gregg Steinhafel said last month that the launch has “fallen well short of expectations” but that he wants to “redefine” the company as a one-stop shop for Canadians.
    Already Target has launched advertisements that emphasize its weekly flyer discounts, and its position as the “all in one place” holiday shop.
    But Target won’t be alone in that quest as other retailers will follow a similar plan to “increase their basket size,” an industry term used to track how many items a shopper piles into their cart each visit, said Winegard.
    The most effective way to fill carts is through “Buy One, Get One Free,” and major discounts. However, Winegard warned that while it has an immediate upside for consumers, it’ll have a ripple effect on the industry.
    Too many deals typically result in a practice she calls “pantry loading,” which is when people stock up on non-perishables, such as mouthwash and clothes, and then visit stores less frequently to spend money — a factor that could knock the wind out of retail sales figures.
    Those discount practices will also filter out weaker companies within three to five years, she said. In clothing, that could force smaller label brands and boutiques to shut their doors.
    Winegard said that one lesson many U.S. retailers haven’t learned is that Canada is a diverse country with buying patterns that vary by region. What works in Toronto won’t necessarily catch on in Edmonton or smaller cities in Quebec, for example.
    Those factors could drive retailers to get creative with how they sell to consumers.
    “It’s what capitalism boasts,” she said.
    “It’s a great time for innovation and viable competitors to really sharpen their chops. The ones that don’t do that will perish.”
    OB

    Who Says Men Can't Shop!


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