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Thread: The Federal Gov to allow dead animals outside of slaugterhouses to be consumed by YOU

  1. #16
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    I don't agree with this because all you need is one "slip up" and a vet becoming slack on their duties and someone or a group of people getting sick and dying. It is bound to happen. But hey.. who cares I guess..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snow Queen View Post
    I don't agree with this because all you need is one "slip up" and a vet becoming slack on their duties and someone or a group of people getting sick and dying. It is bound to happen. But hey.. who cares I guess..
    I don`t see how that`s any different than what could happen at the processing facility. The inspectors there could get slack on their duties and have a slip up just as easily.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveP View Post
    I don`t see how that`s any different than what could happen at the processing facility. The inspectors there could get slack on their duties and have a slip up just as easily.
    ? ? ?

    Under current regulations they couldn't use dead product, so it wouldn't make a difference. At slaughterhouses they aren't doing autopsies to see what an animal died from as they always died in their care.

    Also another thing I noticed in the article is it only states that they will document the time of slaughter. So what if the animal died a week prior to slaughter? How do people know they aren't consuming (quite literally) flesh that has been rotting for weeks.
    Last edited by Snow Queen; Thu, May 17th, 2012 at 07:57 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snow Queen View Post
    ? ? ?

    Under current regulations they couldn't use dead product, so it wouldn't make a difference. At slaughterhouses they aren't doing autopsies to see what an animal died from as they always died in their care.

    Also another thing I noticed in the article is it only states that they will document the time of slaughter. So what if the animal died a week prior to slaughter? How do people know they aren't consuming (quite literally) flesh that has been rotting for weeks.
    Read the article again. The vet examines the animal PRIOR to slaughter. I bolded that part in the second post in this thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveP View Post
    Read the article again. The vet examines the animal PRIOR to slaughter. I bolded that part in the second post in this thread.
    Yes, and my comment was in reference to what I quoted of you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snow Queen View Post
    Yes, and my comment was in reference to what I quoted of you.
    I`m really not following you. the animal is alive when examined by the vet. That isn`t any different from a living animal being inspected at a processing facility.

    Please explain, we seem to be having a communication difficulty of some sort.
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    .
    Last edited by lecale; Sun, Jan 18th, 2015 at 01:12 PM.
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    I don't have the energy to point out why this is wrong.

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    .
    Last edited by lecale; Sun, Jan 18th, 2015 at 01:12 PM.
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    Regarding all the scaremongering from the NDP - the crap about roadkill, etc.

    Tim O’Connor, a spokesperson for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, said that is untrue.
    “Dead stock is not allowed for human consumption,” he said.
    He said right now the federal rules are black and white: under no circumstance can an animal designated for human consumption be slaughtered outside of a registered facility.
    With the proposed rule changes, O’Connor said there could be a possibility for rare cases where an animal could be slaughtered on farm; for example, if a steer broke its leg or was too aggressive to be safely transferred.
    “It would only be under very limited circumstances,” said O’Connor.
    Since losing the steer would be a financial hit to the rancher, they could seek approval from CFIA for euthanizing the animal at their location.
    They would need an inspection by a veterinarian to verify the animal is safe for human consumption before it is euthanized. The vet would also certify the date and method.
    Then the rancher would have to document their techniques, which would have to fall in line with humane treatment and the Health of Animals Act requirements, before transferring the meat to a processing plant within a required time frame where it would be inspected again.
    ...

    “The NDP know full well, despite their outrageous rhetoric, that this proposal will not reduce food safety in any way,” said Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz in a statement.
    “Only live animals that are inspected and safe for human consumption but cannot be transported safely and humanely would be eligible for on-farm slaughter and then transported to a federal processing facility.”
    John Masswohl, director of government and international relations at Canadian Cattlemen's Association, said the proposed rule change is a win-win situation for the better treatment of the animals.
    He said it's better to euthanize an injured animal on a farm and then transport it.
    "Right now, the farmer could only choose to transport it or euthanize and dispose of it," Masswohl said.
    He also said diseased or dead animals would not be considered.
    "I don't know where [the NDP] are coming from, or what regulations they read," said Masswohl.

    http://www.cbc.ca/m/touch/canada/sto...-proposed.html
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveP View Post
    I`m really not following you. the animal is alive when examined by the vet. That isn`t any different from a living animal being inspected at a processing facility.

    Please explain, we seem to be having a communication difficulty of some sort.
    How is it examined when alive though when they can come in already dead? What if the animal is dead at the farm and loaded up then brought into slaughterhouse?

    “Now you can bring in dead stock. It’s okay to bring in that animal into a slaughterhouse, have it cut, wrapped . . . for human consumption.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snow Queen View Post
    How is it examined when alive though when they can come in already dead? What if the animal is dead at the farm and loaded up then brought into slaughterhouse?
    It CAN"T be. That's the whole point. It HAS to be examined when still alive. It is examined at the farm while still alive. This has already been said a half dozen times in this thread, including in the link that TaraF herself posted in the OP. It has to be examined when still alive at the farm, then killed, then transported to the processing facilty.
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    Also, as stated above in the quotes I left - it will be RARE instances where this will be done.
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  14. #29
    Boo Radley Conspirator roseofblack25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glowworm2k View Post
    I just don't regularly eat meat (with the exception of fish), so the changing regulations have little effect on me. My DH and I watched Food, Inc. a few months back. I was sad to see the conditions, but not too surprised; DH was outraged and disgusted by the conditions. After that he and I decided to try to only buy meat when we can afford to get it from local butchers that source the meat locally, so that it is only a special treat reserved for weekend BBQs or a special dinner. Otherwise, we will go without.

    Lately though, we've been having some fabulous meals thanks to DH's dad: he gave us his share of venison from his hunting trip last fall (all frozen in little butcher-wrapped packets) as his wife won't "eat Bambi".... their loss!! We've had venison steaks, venison burgers, and are planning on doing a small venison roast in the upcoming weeks. I love game meat, and it tastes so much better when it lived wild (wild venison has a cedary flavour as opposed to the relative beef-ish taste of farmed deer) that frankly everything else is second-best to me!
    I don't eat a ton of meat either, especially store bought. I just don't care for the taste of most meats. I do eat venison and sometimes moose depending on what it is. I'm not a fan of steaks, sausages or things like that but if it's ground or in burger form I will more than likely eat it and not complain. The only thing store bought I like is chicken bacon mmmmm. I think that would be the only thing I would ever miss if I were to stop buying meat prepackaged from a store.

    I love seafood though so I definitely have that most often, otherwise I get my protein from other food sources.

    That said, I don't fully get the new rules on slaughter, but it doesn't sound like they are going to being shoveling road kill up off the road to feed to us like the first article I read on it implied.
    Last edited by roseofblack25; Sat, May 26th, 2012 at 10:47 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by roseofblack25 View Post
    I don't eat a ton of meat either, especially store bought. I just don't care for the taste of most meats. I do eat venison and sometimes moose depending on what it is. I'm not a fan of steaks, sausages or things like that but if it's ground or in burger form I will more than likely eat it and not complain. The only thing store bought I like is chicken bacon mmmmm. I think that would be the only thing I would ever miss if I were to stop buying meat prepackaged from a store.

    I love seafood though so I definitely have that most often, otherwise I get my protein from other food sources.

    That said, I don't fully get the new rules on slaughter, but it doesn't sound like they are going to being shoveling road kill up off the road to feed to us like the first article I read on it implied.
    I'm with you on the seafood, mmmm. Chicken bacon? I've never heard of that. Turkey bacon, yes. I'll have to look for it when I go grocery shopping tomorrow and give it a try.

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