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Thread: Condensation on windows

  1. #16
    Frosh Canuck
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobjackson View Post
    If you cannot buy a dehumidifier, you can simply move your houseplants outside during the winter to eliminate condensation inside your windows. Drying wet clothes inside also significantly increases interior moisture in your home. So try to avoid doing that.
    I don't have any indoor plants. I also don't dry wet clothes indoors...but thanks for the suggestions !

  2. #17
    Frosh Canuck
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    Quote Originally Posted by reggid View Post
    Several things can cause this. For instance, your house may be sealed "too tight". Do you have a fresh air intake? Or, several other possibilities are: dryer venting in house; a lot of cooking that creates steam; excess shower time;or anything else that dumps moisture in the house. One other thing - do you have a good seal around the sash when the window are closed?
    Jacob is right about houseplants. They could increase humidity too.
    We had a different situation, long story short: plumbing, bad leakage and flooding as a result, so we bought a larger dehumidifier to prevent problems with moisture and mold. And since your dehumidifier is not that powerful, always check if doors are closed for the place you are riding of moisture.
    I do think my house is sealed too tight, which a lot of newer homes are. I also think my last house had an older furnace (not energy efficient) while this newer home does. I heard energy efficient furnaces can cause excess moisture in the home. Yes I have fresh air intake. My dryer vents outside so that's not the problem. I have noticed that if I keep my air exchanger on ALL the time, it does eliminate the condensation on the windows. The problem is I really don't want to run the air exchanger all the time because it requires my furnace fan to be on as well. Plus sometimes the air exchanger blows in nothing but really cold air. I also am not sure if it's a good idea to run the air exchanger when the weather gets to double negative numbers. I don't want it to freeze up. I don't know, but homes are so stressful ! Thanks for your advice it is appreciated !

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