User Tag List

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 40
Like Tree109Likes

Thread: Getting CPP and working: would you do this?

  1. #16
    Smart Canuck Arjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Greater Toronto area
    Posts
    1,380
    Likes Received
    2930
    Trading Score
    13 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by walkonby View Post
    This was a huge topic at my work too, to take it early or not?
    Read this analogy to see what the break even point is. ( this article was updated in 2015 )

    What is the mathematical break-even point?



    Under the old rules, the decision to collect CPP early was really based on a mathematical calculation of the break-even point. Before 2012, this break-even point was age 77. With the new rules, every Canadian needs to understand the math. Hereís the example of twins that I used before, with the break-even point updated to 2015 values.

    ďJanet and Beth are twins. Letís assume they both qualify for the same CPP of $502 per month at age 65. Letís further assume, Beth decides to take CPP now at age 60 at a reduced amount while Janet decides she wants to wait till 65 because she will get more income by deferring the income for 5 years.
    Under Canada Pension Plan benefits, Beth can take income at age 60 based on a reduction factor of 0.58% for each month prior to her 65th birthday. Thus Bethís benefit will be reduced by 34.8% (0.58% x 60 months) for a monthly income of $327.30 starting on her 60th birthday.
    Letís fast forward 5 years. Now, Beth and Janet are both 65. Over the last 5 years, Beth has collected $327.30 per month totaling $19,638. In other words, Beth has made $19,638 before Janet has collected a single CPP cheque. That being said, Janet is now going to get $502 per month for CPP or $174.70 per month more than Bethís $327.30. The question is how many months does Janet need to collect more pension than Beth to make up the $19,638 Beth is ahead? It will take Janet 113 months to make up the $19,638 at $174.70 per month. In other words, before age 74.4, Beth is ahead of Janet and after age 74.4, Janet is ahead of Beth.Ē

    https://retirehappy.ca/four-reasons-...st-2011-rules/

    I suppose it depends on your health and your " luck " . If you are darn tootin sure you will live a long life then wait to collect it at 65, if your health is questionable and you believe in Murphy's Law then draw it at 60.
    Does this break-even calculation take into account the time value of money?
    ROMEO, barbis9, walkonby and 1 others like this.

  2. #17
    Smart Canuck Arjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Greater Toronto area
    Posts
    1,380
    Likes Received
    2930
    Trading Score
    13 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by Cake View Post
    People has different factors, longevity, pension plans, disability, inheritances, etc... and for tax reasons and financial planning CPP is one of the items that needs to be considered in the big picture.
    Another factor that influenced the decisions of a few people I know IRL was their perceived "need". I put this in quotes because they all used this word although from my perspective, they wanted the money rather than actually needing it.
    barbis9, Ciel, walkonby and 1 others like this.

  3. #18
    Mastermind Shwa Girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    23,289
    Likes Received
    38645
    Trading Score
    7 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by walkonby View Post
    This was a huge topic at my work too, to take it early or not?
    Read this analogy to see what the break even point is. ( this article was updated in 2015 )

    What is the mathematical break-even point?



    Under the old rules, the decision to collect CPP early was really based on a mathematical calculation of the break-even point. Before 2012, this break-even point was age 77. With the new rules, every Canadian needs to understand the math. Hereís the example of twins that I used before, with the break-even point updated to 2015 values.

    ďJanet and Beth are twins. Letís assume they both qualify for the same CPP of $502 per month at age 65. Letís further assume, Beth decides to take CPP now at age 60 at a reduced amount while Janet decides she wants to wait till 65 because she will get more income by deferring the income for 5 years.
    Under Canada Pension Plan benefits, Beth can take income at age 60 based on a reduction factor of 0.58% for each month prior to her 65th birthday. Thus Bethís benefit will be reduced by 34.8% (0.58% x 60 months) for a monthly income of $327.30 starting on her 60th birthday.
    Letís fast forward 5 years. Now, Beth and Janet are both 65. Over the last 5 years, Beth has collected $327.30 per month totaling $19,638. In other words, Beth has made $19,638 before Janet has collected a single CPP cheque. That being said, Janet is now going to get $502 per month for CPP or $174.70 per month more than Bethís $327.30. The question is how many months does Janet need to collect more pension than Beth to make up the $19,638 Beth is ahead? It will take Janet 113 months to make up the $19,638 at $174.70 per month. In other words, before age 74.4, Beth is ahead of Janet and after age 74.4, Janet is ahead of Beth.Ē

    https://retirehappy.ca/four-reasons-...st-2011-rules/

    I suppose it depends on your health and your " luck " . If you are darn tootin sure you will live a long life then wait to collect it at 65, if your health is questionable and you believe in Murphy's Law then draw it at 60.
    Thanks for the article and link. I looked at the comments and my coworker's plan came to mind. My coworker looked at how long parents and grandparents lived before deciding on taking the money early. Like one of the commenters (Russ), my coworker invests the money so that there is little or no tax paid on any again.
    barbis9, Ciel and walkonby like this.

  4. #19
    Junior Canuck
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    530
    Likes Received
    1620
    Trading Score
    1 (100%)




    Another very important consideration in the CPP evaluation is that you are only allowed the maximum payment. Therefore if a couple are both maximizing their CPP and one partner dies - that CPP is sucked up by the government. No increase payment to the surviving spouse in this case because they are already receiving the max payment. Break even point for taking pension at 60 vs 65 is that you need to live to 73 years old. Only 6% of retirees receive the max payment at 65 yrs old. My father received 2 CPP cheques before dying and my mother had a survivor benefit only 2 yrs before she passed away. Government sucked up the rest from my dadís 40 yrs of employment.

    I have seen no comparison is you take your CPP at 60 and pay down debt or put into a TFSA and invest it. This would no doubt shift the break even point of 73 years to even an older age point.

    I turn 60 at the end of this year. I intend to take my CPP and continue to work part time - this will continue to grow my CPP payout. My CPP will be used to pay down debt and pay for holidays.

    Average CPP payment is $650
    ROMEO, barbis9, Ciel and 3 others like this.

  5. #20
    CaToonie
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    271
    Likes Received
    446
    Trading Score
    0 (0%)



    wait until 65. don't take it early. especially if you are still working. tax man cometh!
    barbis9 and Shwa Girl like this.

  6. #21
    Mastermind Shwa Girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    23,289
    Likes Received
    38645
    Trading Score
    7 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by dyalect View Post
    wait until 65. don't take it early. especially if you are still working. tax man cometh!
    interesting that you say 65
    another coworker retired at 59
    died this weekend at 65, suddenly
    so didn't have a lot of time time to enjoy CPP etc

  7. #22
    Smart Canuck
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    GTA Area
    Posts
    1,902
    Likes Received
    5371
    Trading Score
    2 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by dagney View Post
    Another very important consideration in the CPP evaluation is that you are only allowed the maximum payment.

    I turn 60 at the end of this year. I intend to take my CPP and continue to work part time - this will continue to grow my CPP payout. My CPP will be used to pay down debt and pay for holidays.

    Average CPP payment is $650
    Once you start withdrawing from CPP you can no longer contribute to it. If your employer deducts CPP off your part time wages, you will get it back when you file for income tax. Your CPP payout will not grow anymore once you start receiving it even if you continue to work.
    Last edited by barbis9; Thu, Apr 26th, 2018 at 09:39 PM.
    ROMEO and Shwa Girl like this.

  8. #23
    Smart Canuck
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    GTA Area
    Posts
    1,902
    Likes Received
    5371
    Trading Score
    2 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by Shwa Girl View Post
    interesting that you say 65
    another coworker retired at 59
    died this weekend at 65, suddenly
    so didn't have a lot of time time to enjoy CPP etc
    Very sad.
    ROMEO and Shwa Girl like this.

  9. #24
    Junior Canuck
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    530
    Likes Received
    1620
    Trading Score
    1 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by barbis9 View Post
    Once you start withdrawing from CPP you can no longer contribute to it. If your employer deducts CPP off your part time wages, you will get it back when you file for income tax. Your CPP payout will not grow anymore once you start receiving it even if you continue to work.
    From my understanding, that rule has changed. If you collect CPP and continue to work it is mandatory to keep paying into CPP. The government will then adjust your CPP higher. But yes the taxman always wins. While one must always consider health problems, there are always unexpected vehicle accidents too. I recall a few years ago in Saskatoon a newly retired married couple who were both teachers - killed in a car accident. All their CPP gone in a flash, plus a majority of their teachers pensions.
    Shwa Girl likes this.

  10. #25
    Smart Canuck
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    3,139
    Likes Received
    16767
    Trading Score
    1 (100%)




    If you continue working past 65, it is the employees decision to continue paying into CPP or not. You must fill in a form to cease deductions at 65 if you so choose. Otherwise if you opt to continue, you will be paying into and receiving a post retirement benefit( all this as per CPP website).
    barbis9 and Shwa Girl like this.

  11. #26
    Smart Canuck frugal50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,996
    Likes Received
    10225
    Trading Score
    0 (0%)




    best to collect CPP at 65 and if you're female at 70
    the pay out is bigger and since women liver longer
    You can't change other people. You can only change yourself"
    - H. H. Getter

    when we change our attitude, we change our lives





  12. #27
    CaNewbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    4
    Likes Received
    7
    Trading Score
    0 (0%)


    Auditor General of Canada on CPP Disability approvals showed that out of 70,000 annual CPP Disability Applicants, only about 40% were approved after the first application.
    Since then, Service Canada has simplified the forms and application process to make it easier for applicants. But CPP Disability denial rates are still considerably high compared to other countries. Most of the time the reasons for the denial are not immediately clear, leaving applicants confused as to what they need to do in order to actually be approved.
    Some of the reasons CPP Disability applicants get denied may include:

    1. The impairment not being recognized as eligible by the CPP Disability requirements
    2. A lack of information in the application to prove eligibility
    3. A lack of knowledge about certain provisions that if applied to the application, may have given it eligibility.

    I myself got denied for these benefits
    ROMEO, barbis9 and Shwa Girl like this.

  13. #28
    Junior Canuck
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    530
    Likes Received
    1620
    Trading Score
    1 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by barbis9 View Post
    Once you start withdrawing from CPP you can no longer contribute to it. If your employer deducts CPP off your part time wages, you will get it back when you file for income tax. Your CPP payout will not grow anymore once you start receiving it even if you continue to work.
    This is incorrect - check the government website.
    You can continue to work from 60-65 and contribute to CPP. Once you are
    finally done work your CPP will be re-calculated.
    Bonus once one spouse is collecting a pension, that couple can income
    split the pension so possibility of less income tax to pay out.
    barbis9 likes this.

  14. #29
    Junior Canuck
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    530
    Likes Received
    1620
    Trading Score
    1 (100%)




    Quote Originally Posted by frugal50 View Post
    best to collect CPP at 65 and if you're female at 70
    the pay out is bigger and since women liver longer

    Yes, that would be what the government would like you to think!
    Cause they will scoop all those payments from people who pass away between 65-70 years old.
    Use those payments between 60-65 to pay off debt, top up a TFSA, income split with your spouse too.
    Last edited by dagney; Wed, Jan 1st, 2020 at 01:53 PM.
    barbis9 and Shwa Girl like this.

  15. #30
    CaNewbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    4
    Likes Received
    7
    Trading Score
    0 (0%)


    Quote Originally Posted by Shwa Girl View Post
    interesting that you say 65
    another coworker retired at 59
    died this weekend at 65, suddenly
    so didn't have a lot of time time to enjoy CPP etc
    Sad!!
    barbis9 and Shwa Girl like this.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •