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Thread: Our grocery chains selling shrimp cleaned by slaves....

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    Mastermind Lynn49's Avatar
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    50% of the shrimp we consume in Canada is processed abroad from Thailand and Vietnam; children are forced into slavery conditions to clean them for us...If you feel this is unjust, use this form to ask your grocery chains what they're doing to prevent this atrocious manufacturing process:


    1. Loblaw Companies Ltd (Real Canadian Superstore, Fortinos, Loblaws, No Frills, etc.)
    2. Metro Inc. (Food Basics, Metro, Super C, etc.)
    3. Sobeys (Foodland, FreshCo, Price Chopper, Sobeys, etc.)
    4. Overwaitea Food Group (Subsiduary of Jim Pattison Group) (Save-On-Foods, etc
    5. From WORLD VISION:

    https://e-activist.com/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=20&ea.campaign.id=46083&ea.url .id=512997&forwarded=true


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    Mastermind Natalka's Avatar
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    The news story - Canada is not mentioned, but that doesn't mean they don't get supply from the suspect places. Hoping since this is brought to light, suppliers are changed.

    http://globalnews.ca/news/2399736/in...aves-children/

    This is interesting

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/12...n_8853732.html

    Good news stories - CDN grown shrimp

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/shri...chio-1.3371804

    http://www.lfpress.com/2015/11/23/home-grown-shrimp
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    CaNewbie Catwa_k's Avatar
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    is that real they are hiring young kids? i read a news few years ago, Loblaw hire young kids and cheap labour in India too.
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    Smart Canuck mulock's Avatar
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    It's deplorable that companies overseas would use child labor, but you will be even more disgusted to learn how these shrimp are raised (often in polluted, sewage-infested systems): http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/0...with-bacteria/

    I don't buy any of these.
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    CaLoonie AddyB's Avatar
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    I am originally from Singapore. The children in Thailand and India might starve if they weren't employed. Yes I agree that the foreign companies should check more thoroughly but I think most of the burden should be on the shoulders of the Thai & Indian owners who pay less than a living wage and where their governments are so corrupt that these companies are allowed to exploit child labor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AddyB View Post
    I am originally from Singapore. The children in Thailand and India might starve if they weren't employed. Yes I agree that the foreign companies should check more thoroughly but I think most of the burden should be on the shoulders of the Thai & Indian owners who pay less than a living wage and where their governments are so corrupt that these companies are allowed to exploit child labor.

    Yup..In the western world , we abolished child labour fairly recently after a long history ..a very long history of having children work in hazardous industries..

    Expecting third world countries to adhere to our hard won social norms without any financial or moral backing while the majority of those affected live in near poverty and all healthy hands are needed to provide for the family is short-sighted.

    I do not under any circumstances support child labour though I understand how it was historically used.

    As a world, as a nation we need to be pro-active in ensuring the world's children of both genders get a suitable education so that they in turn can lift their countries from poverty and hardship towards a more fair society for the whole of their inhabitants..
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    Mastermind Shwa Girl's Avatar
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    The majority of Ontario grown fruits and veggies are picked by migrant workers who get very, very low pay and poor working conditions. They are here from many countries.

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    no more door to door! :) walkonby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shwa Girl View Post
    The majority of Ontario grown fruits and veggies are picked by migrant workers who get very, very low pay and poor working conditions. They are here from many countries.
    So true BUT those migrant workers are not children....or are they??
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    http://www.thespec.com/whatson-story...n-flamborough/

    Migrant worker killed in Ontario....very sad. The other was injuried and will be returning back to Mexico.
    Last edited by barbis9; Fri, Aug 12th, 2016 at 07:53 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shwa Girl View Post
    The majority of Ontario grown fruits and veggies are picked by migrant workers who get very, very low pay and poor working conditions. They are here from many countries.
    Brexit could herald end to fruit and veg sales, producers warn

    British fruit and vegetables would all but vanish from shops if Brexit means the foreign workers who pick virtually all the home-grown produce are no longer able to come to the UK, according to some of the country’s biggest producers.
    They warn that the nation’s food security would be damaged and that produce in UK shops would become more expensive if the freedom of movement for EU workers came to an end. They are urging ministers to set up a new permit scheme for seasonal workers.
    Without a scheme, they say production would move abroad, where many already have large operations, or would switch to cereals which are harvested by machines. The Brexit vote is already deterring foreign workers from coming to the UK, the producers report.
    About 90% of British fruit, vegetables and salads are picked, graded and packed by 60,000 to 70,000 workers from overseas, mostly from eastern Europe. Many of these work in areas which voted very strongly to leave the EU: the largely agricultural borough of Boston in Lincolnshire had the highest vote for leaving the EU in the whole country, at 75%.
    Britain has long relied on low-paid migrant workers doing farm-work. Should UK leave the EU...then there will likely a push for the un- or under-employed to be forced into this kind of work or the industry will fold..


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    Mastermind Shwa Girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkonby View Post
    So true BUT those migrant workers are not children....or are they??
    Sadly, some migrant workers picking fruit and veggies in Ontario are children-12 or 14 years of age
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/jamaic...sket-1.3577643
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    Mastermind Natalka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shwa Girl View Post
    Sadly, some migrant workers picking fruit and veggies in Ontario are children-12 or 14 years of age
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/jamaic...sket-1.3577643
    That story is awful - but nothing about young workers in it.


    In SK, you can work at 14 or 15 under some circumstances, in all industries at 16.
    I think family farms are exempt.

    Back in the olden days (1973) I was 12 when I got my first 'real' job.
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    Keeping safe on the farm

    Though incidents are few and far between, farm kids are more likely to be killed or hurt compared with their urban counterparts, writes Carrie Tait


    Connor Pearce is 13. He is a farm kid, and drives a big New Holland tractor when spreading pig manure on his family’s fields. The Pearces call the tractor Big Foot, and when Connor is in the cab, he goes slow, maybe 10 kilometres an hour. He is allowed to load and spread manure only when he is within an adult’s eyesight.
    Connor’s two younger brothers, Ethan and Owen, work on the farm, too, although they are not allowed to drive Big Foot on their own yet. The Pearce boys are careful and know the house rules. They know one little slip can kill someone.
    One little slip killed their sister Lyla Dawn in June, 2013. She was four-and-a-half, climbed onto a hay wagon when her grandpa was not looking, and fell under a wheel when the tractor pulling the wagon jerked a bit. Lyla had dimples, a flurry of freckles just below her blue eyes, and dirty blond hair with bangs. Her ears were pierced and her favourite job was to help feed the pigs, Michelle Pearce, the kids’ mom, said this week.
    “She had a stuffed kitty cat that she took everywhere, that she slept with every night,” Ms. Pearce said.
    Lyla finished a farm safety course in kindergarten shortly before the accident on the family farm near Leamington, Ont., and her mom believes governments should put more money into education programs like those.
    But Ms. Pearce does not believe legislation should impose rules such as a minimum age to operate machinery. As farm deaths across Canada drop for adults, they have remained flat for children, and governments everywhere have been reluctant to legislate tighter rules for kids working on farms.
    That includes Alberta, where the governing NDP is revamping farm safety legislation, but remains vague about what, if anything, it will do when it comes to children. The government on Tuesday announced a handful of consultation meetings, but any changes that would tell farm families what to do with their offspring will meet resistance.
    The consultations come one month after three young girls – Catie Bott, who was 13, and her 11-year-old twin sisters, Jana and Dara – were killed in a farm incident in Withrow, Alta. They fell into a grain truck and were buried in canola. The RCMP deemed it an accident and the investigation is closed.
    Ms. Pearce gets nervous since Lyla’s accident as her sons take on increasingly dangerous jobs on the farm, but she allows it. Farmers, ranchers and politicians across North America applaud – or at the very least, respect – the Pearces’ approach.
    “They want to be farmers and that’s part of the life,” she said. “So, I need to teach them to be safe.”
    Alberta’s Office of the Chief Medical Examiner counts 11 farm deaths so far in 2015, with four of them children. One person under 18 died in a farm-related incident in the province in 2014, according to the OCME’s preliminary statistics, updated on Nov. 18, on deaths it investigates. Sixteen adults were killed in farm incidents last year, the OCME said.
    Farm kids are far more likely to be killed or hurt compared with their urban counterparts. In Alberta, for example, farm children under 18 were 83 per cent more likely to suffer severe injury or death than city kids between 1999 and 2010, according to a comprehensive doctoral thesis by Kyungsu Kim at the University of Alberta’s School of Public Health. Children living in rural areas, excluding First Nations, were 73 per cent more likely to be severely injured or die than city kids, while the risk for First Nations children living in rural areas was nearly three times higher.
    Lori Sigurdson, Alberta’s Minister of Jobs, Skills, Training and Labour, said the government is concerned about the disparity between farm kids and city children, but has not fleshed out how it will address the problem.
    Family farms, she said, are “an essential part of our culture here in Alberta,” but employees and families must be kept safe. The government must be sure it is “respecting family farms … but also making sure that there is safety and fairness. So it is very much a balancing act.”


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    Officials hope child fatalities spur farm safety culture

    The Alberta government recently released statistics showing that there were eight other farm deaths in 2015, two of them children. One was 10-year-old Joseph Stahl, who was driving a forklift on a Hutterite colony when the machine toppled into a ditch and pinned him underneath.
    There were other child deaths on farms across the country. In one case in southwestern Saskatchewan, Layne Langridge, 14, fell in a truck loaded with grain. His grandfather, 66-year-old Dennis Becker, tried to save him. They both died.
    Statistics from Canadian Agricultural Injury Reporting show that between 2000 and 2008, there were about 10 child farm deaths each year in Canada. The average before that was 16.
    Jennifer Austin with 4-H Canada said the most recent deaths, especially of the Bott sisters, have deeply touched her organization. It is starting a new fund in 2016 to develop additional safety programs.
    "We know clubs are already focused on farm safety but this will put a further emphasis on farm safety -- and at a time when it's very much on the minds of people in rural communities," she said.


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    Agriculture fatalities in Canada 1990-2008 pdf file..

    1,975 accidental deaths recorded..14% were children..


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